Rosamund Street (Low Level) Sidings

Came across Rosamund Street on RMWeb.  Only 5′ long in 4mm scale (plus sector plate and fiddleyard, but a very attractive design.  It also contains the classic ‘Inglenook’ shunting puzzle.  The builder describes the concept:

As a trainspotter in the late 60s and early 70s the ultimate aim was always to ‘clear B.R.’  But, sitting in a BRUTE at Cardiff General logging Westerns and Brushes would never achieve such an ambition.

“If you want to clear BR, you need to get the shunters” extolled my spotting mentor, Doug.  So, instead of undertaking lone wolf shed bashes to Birmingham (for Bescot & Saltley) or Manchester (for Longsight, Newton Heath & Reddish) I joined a local railway society that ran weekend coach trips to such out of the way places as King’s Lynn, Westhouses, Northwich and Frodingham.
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A browse through my 1971 and 1972 locoshed books would show my Brushes (now Cl.47) and “H-Bombs” (now Cl.20) looking decidedly healthy ……………. but those shunters, the lack of lines under their numbers stood out like a sore thumb.
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The only way to track the shunters down would be to find out where they worked, and where they stabled at weekends – all this in the days before the indispensable  “Shunter Duties” was an idea, yet a publication.
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Shunters could spend weeks away from their home depot, and they could work many miles from that depot e.g. a Canton shunter would be outbased at Aberdare (only 25 miles) whereas a Landore shunter could be at Carmarthen, Whitland or worse, Fishguard Harbour !
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Those shunters not under repair on shed, or working as shed, yard  or station pilots lurked in dingy urban environments, small yards or sidings hidden away amongst engineering works, factories and depressing streets where access was impossible unless you were either ‘in the know’ or had special forces training.
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Such a place was Rosamund Street, actually Rosamund Street (Low Level) Sidings.

Features of the design are the brick embankments and industrial buildings surrounding the layout.  Plus some excellent inset trackwork and that fascinating large pipe running along the buildings – is it some strange manufacturing process or just the local sewer?

These two shots show the empire in its entirety.  The small dimensions of the layout are compensated for by expanding vertically.

Unfortunately, it looks as if Rosamund Street will be retired for a larger layout.  Still, the inspiration is remains!

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About snitchthebudgie

Secretary of the East Surrey N Gauge railway club
This entry was posted in Inspiration, Layout design, Out and about and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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